A Guide to British Citizenship 2024


British citizenship is a legal status granted to individuals who meet specific criteria set by the United Kingdom. It confers a range of rights and responsibilities, including the right to live and work in the UK, access to public services, and the ability to participate in the political system.

Unless you are British by descent or birth, you would usually need to apply to the UK Home Office to be granted British citizenship through a process called ‚Äėnaturalisation‚Äô.

The British citizenship application process will require you to show you meet the relevant eligibility requirements. It can be a costly process, and you will lose your fee if your application is refused. There is also no right of appeal. With so much at stake, it will be important to get your application right the first time.

In this guide, we explain the eligibility and process to apply for British citizenship through naturalisation, with practical advice on how to give your application the best chance of success.

 

Section A: Obtaining British Citizenship

 

British citizenship can be acquired automatically by descent, birth, registration, or, in most cases, naturalisation.

 

1. British Citizenship through Naturalisation

 

Naturalisation is the most common route for foreign nationals seeking British citizenship.

To be eligible to naturalise as a British citizen, you must be over 18 years of age and have held valid status in the UK under either indefinite leave to remain, permanent residence, or EU settled status for at least 12 months. If you are married to a British citizen, you can apply as soon as you are granted settled status and will not need to wait 12 months to apply.

You will also be required to meet the residency requirement, demonstrate proficiency in the English language, pass the Life in the UK test, and prove you are of good character.

 

2. British Citizenship by Birth

 

Under British law, not all children born in the UK are automatically recognised as British citizens.

A child will automatically qualify as a British citizen if they were born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983, and at the time of their birth, one of their parents was a British citizen or held settled status in the UK. Settled status refers to holding Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) or permanent residence.

If the child was born in the UK to parents who were neither British citizens nor settled in the UK, the child will not have acquired British citizenship by birth.

Children born in the UK to parents who later become settled or become British citizens may register for British citizenship.

 

3. British Citizenship by Descent

 

Under British citizenship by descent rules, individuals born outside the UK may become UK citizens if one or both of their parents or, in some cases, grandparents are British citizens.

With British citizenship by descent, however, you cannot normally pass citizenship on to children born outside of the UK unless they were born to a parent in Crown, designated or EU service.

You can be a British citizen otherwise than by descent where you were born or adopted in the UK before 1 January 1983; born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983 to a mother or, if your parents were married, a father who was a British citizen or settled in the UK; born in the UK on or after 1 July 2006 where either parent is a British citizen or settled in the UK; or where you have been given citizenship after applying for it in your own right, for example, by being naturalised or registered as a British citizen.

 

4. British Citizenship by Marriage

 

Citizenship by marriage allows spouses or civil partners of British citizens to apply for British citizenship. To be eligible, the applicant must have lived in the UK for at least three years before the application and meet other standard naturalisation requirements, including having Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) or permanent residence at the time of application. Unlike most naturalisation applicants, those applying as a spouse do not have to have held ILR for 12 months to apply for citizenship; they can apply as soon as they are granted settled status.

Additionally, the applicant must meet other standard naturalisation requirements, such as demonstrating proficiency in the English language and passing the Life in the UK test.

 

5. British Citizenship by Registration

 

In the event that you were born in the UK before 1 January 1983, typically, you will be automatically classed as a British citizen and will not need to apply to register your citizenship. You can apply for a British passport as proof of your nationality.

If you were born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983, and one of your parents was a British citizen or settled in the UK, you should automatically attain citizenship and can apply for a passport.

You may, however, need to register as British if you were born on or after 1 January 1983 and either you are under 18 and, since your birth, one of your parents became a British citizen or got permission to stay in the UK permanently, or you lived in the UK until you were ten years old or older.

 

6. Registration for under 18s

 

To apply under this route, you must be under 18 years old when you submit your application. If you were born on or after 1 January 1983 and one of your parents considered the UK as their home, you may be able to register your citizenship where any of the following applied to one of your parents after your birth:

 

a. They became a British citizen

b. They were granted indefinite leave to remain in the UK

c. They were granted settled status, also known as indefinite leave to remain under the EU Settlement Scheme

d. They were granted indefinite leave to enter the UK

Once a child reaches the age of 18, they must apply for British citizenship as adults, either by registration if they have an entitlement or by naturalisation.

 

7. Registration if you lived in the UK until you were 10

 

If you were born on or after 1 January 1983 and you lived in the UK until you were aged ten or older, you can again register to become a British citizen if you satisfy the following criteria:

 

a. You were born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983

b. You are ten years of age or over

c. You have spent no more than 90 days outside the UK in each of the first ten years of your life, although in special circumstances, the Home Secretary may make an exception to this requirement

d. You are of good character

 

Section B: Eligibility Criteria to Apply for British Citizenship

 

You are eligible to apply to naturalise as a British citizen on the basis of residence if you satisfy the following criteria:

 

a. Age: You must be 18 years old or older.

b. Residency:¬†You have spent three continuous years in the UK prior to your application date (the ‚Äėqualifying period‚Äô). Your total number of absences from the UK over the qualifying period does not exceed 270 days. Your total number of absences from the UK during the 12 months prior to application does not exceed 90 days

c. Immigration Status: You have held for at least 12 months Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK, or as an EEA national have permanent residence in the UK or have been granted EU settled status.

d. Good Character: You meet the good character requirements and do not have a serious or recent criminal record.

e. Knowledge of Language and Life in the UK: You must satisfy the English language requirements and pass the Life in the UK test.

f. Compliance with Immigration Rules: You have been compliant with UK immigration rules throughout the qualifying period.

g. Intent to Reside: You intend to remain in the UK.

 

1. Residency Requirements

 

To be eligible for British citizenship, applicants must fulfil specific residency requirements. Typically, you must have lived in the UK for at least five years or three years if married to a British citizen.

During this period, you should not have spent more than 450 days outside the UK in the last five years, or 270 days if married to a British citizen. Additionally, you must not have been outside the UK for more than 90 days in the last 12 months.

Importantly, you must have held Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) or settled status for at least 12 months before applying, unless you are married to a British citizen when you can apply for naturalisation as soon as you are granted settled status.

 

2. English Language Proficiency

 

The English language requirement can only be met with a degree taught or researched in English or by passing a Home Office-approved Secure English Language Testing (SELT) at B1, B2, C1, or C2 level unless you are exempt.

Currently, nationals of the following countries are exempt from the English language requirement: Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, New Zealand, Ireland (for citizenship only), St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago and the USA.

 

3. Life in the UK Test

 

Most citizenship applicants have to pass the Life in the UK test, a computer-based, multiple-choice test with questions on British life, traditions, politics and customs.

The test costs £50 to sit and consists of 24 multiple-choice questions covering topics such as British values, history, traditions, and everyday life. You must book the test online, pay a fee, and prepare using the official handbook. You need to score 75% to pass. If you fail, you can retake the test. There is no restriction on the number of resits you can do, but you will have to pay for each attempt.

If you have already passed the Life in the UK test as part of your application for indefinite leave to remain, you will not need to take the test again for your citizenship application.

 

4. Good Character Requirement

 

The good character requirement is a complex area and a common reason for British citizenship application refusals.

Applicants over the age of 10 applying to naturalise or register as a British citizen will have to satisfy the good character requirement. This includes proving you do not have a recent or serious criminal record and you have not committed immigration fraud, for example, by trying to deceive the Home Office or breaching the UK immigration rules in the ten years preceding your application.

The Home Office will check your criminal record and may consider your financial history, including any bankruptcy issues.

Previous offences and convictions are likely to affect your British citizenship application, although this does depend on a number of factors, including the type of conviction or offence. You will be required to submit details in your application of cautions, warnings, drink driving offences, fixed penalty notices and road traffic offences, civil judgments, civil penalties for illegal working, and, if you have been declared bankrupt at any time, details of the bankruptcy proceedings.

 

DMS PERSPECTIVE:

While full disclosure is mandatory, not all convictions may be taken into account when your application is being processed, for example, when the conviction is considered ‚Äėspent‚Äô. This could, therefore, affect the timing of your application. We can advise on your options if you are concerned about your eligibility.

Applicants must also demonstrate that they have respected and will continue to respect the laws of the UK.

 

Section C: British Citizenship Application Process

 

The application process for British citizenship is designed to ensure applicants meet all the necessary criteria.

The process begins with applicants verifying their eligibility, which includes meeting residency requirements, demonstrating English language proficiency, passing the Life in the UK test, and fulfilling the good character requirement.

Where eligible, applicants can then move on to preparing their supporting documents, including proof of identity (such as a passport or biometric residence permit), proof of residency, evidence of English language proficiency, and the Life in the UK test pass certificate. The good character requirement entails providing a criminal record certificate and financial history, ensuring no involvement in serious criminal activities or immigration fraud.

Applicants will also need to provide two referees to verify their identity. Referees should be professionals, know the applicant personally, and meet specific criteria set by the Home Office.

With the evidence prepared and referees in place, the applicant can then complete the application form online, which for most applicants will be Form AN, via the UK government’s website.

 

DMS PERSPECTIVE:

Incorrect or incomplete citizenship applications will be rejected without a refund of the application fee. Double-check your forms and documents before you submit them to ensure all the required information has been provided.

After submitting the application form and paying the application fee, applicants then book and attend a biometrics appointment at a local UK Visa and Citizenship Application Services (UKVCAS) centre, where their biometric information will be taken.

After submitting the application and paying the required fees, the processing time usually takes around six months.

While most British citizenship applicants typically do not attend an interview as part of the standard application process, the Home Office may request an interview in certain circumstances to verify information or clarify details in the application.

If the application is approved, applicants will be invited to a citizenship ceremony, where they will take an oath of allegiance and receive their certificate of British citizenship. This ceremony marks the final step in becoming a British citizen, granting full rights and privileges.

 

1. British Citizenship Step-by-Step Application Guide

 

Step 1: Check Eligibility

Ensure you meet all the eligibility criteria, including residency requirements, English language proficiency, the good character requirement, and passing the Life in the UK test.

 

Step 2: Prepare Your Documents

Gather all necessary documents to support your application (see the detailed list below).

 

Step 3: Complete the Application Form

Fill out the British citizenship application form (Form AN for most applicants) online via the UK government’s website.

 

Step 4: Book and Attend a Biometrics Appointment

After submitting your application, book an appointment to provide your biometric information (fingerprints and a photo) at a local UK Visa and Citizenship Application Services (UKVCAS) centre.

 

Step 5: Submit Your Application

Submit your completed application form and pay the application fee online. Make sure all the required documents are uploaded and accurate.

 

Step 6 Attend Your Citizenship Ceremony

If your application is approved, you will be invited to attend a citizenship ceremony where you will receive your certificate of British citizenship.

 

2. British Citizenship Supporting Documents

 

The Home Office is clear that it will not process UK nationality applications that are without the required supporting documents. In many cases, it may also be advisable to supply additional documents to ensure comprehensive evidence is provided for consideration.

As a minimum, supporting documents should include identification, evidence that you meet the standards for knowledge of Life in the UK and English language, proof of your UK residence, evidence that you currently hold valid settled status in the UK, and documents confirming your nationality, marriage and earnings if you are not paid through PAYE.

 

DMS PERSPECTIVE:

The Home Office can request further information from applicants if there are issues with the supporting documents, such as missing or incomplete documentation. This will result in a delay in processing while you gather and submit the new information, and you will have to wait longer to receive a decision. To avoid delays, take advice on your circumstances to ensure you are providing sufficient documentation to support your application.

 

3. British Citizenship Referees

 

As part of your application, you will need to provide the contact details of two referees to verify your identity. Your referees must have known you personally for at least three years. One referee should be a person of professional standing, such as a doctor, teacher, or accountant. The other must be a British citizen aged over 25.

Referees cannot be related to you, your solicitor or agent, be employed by the Home Office or have any criminal convictions within the past ten years.

Referees are required to complete a section of the citizenship application form. They must provide their personal details, confirm how they know the applicant, and sign a declaration that the information is accurate. By signing, referees attest to the applicant’s good character and authenticity. This step ensures that the application is credible and that the referees are trustworthy individuals who can vouch for the applicant’s identity and integrity.

 

4. British Citizenship Application Fees

 

The current fee for adult applications is £1,630, which includes the £130 citizenship ceremony fee. The fee for children under 18 is £1,214.

An additional fee of £19.20 is required for biometric enrolment.

Fees can be paid online using a credit or debit card when submitting your application.

 

5. Processing Times for British Citizenship Applications

 

Applications for British citizenship usually take up to 6 months. In some cases, it may take longer if there are issues with your documentation or application form. This makes it critical to ensure your submission is fully complete and accurate.

 

Section D: Common Challenges Applying for British Citizenship

 

Applying for British citizenship can be a complex and challenging process, and understanding the common pitfalls can help applicants avoid a refused application.

 

1. Common Grounds for Refused British Citizenship Applications

 

Applications for British citizenship can be refused for several reasons, often stemming from errors or omissions in the application process. One common ground for refusal is incomplete or incorrect application forms.

Applications may be rejected if the form is not filled out correctly or if mandatory sections are left incomplete, leading to delays and potential denials.

Another frequent issue is insufficient residency evidence. Applicants must provide adequate proof of residency and meet the residency requirements to qualify. Failure to do so can result in rejection. Similarly, the lack of required documents, such as proof of identity, residency, language proficiency, or Life in the UK test results, can also lead to a denial. Ensuring all documentation is accurate and complete is crucial for a successful application.

A criminal record can significantly impact the good character assessment, a critical component of the application. A serious or recent criminal record or failure to disclose convictions can lead to rejection.

Additionally, failing the required English language test or the Life in the UK test can be a barrier to citizenship. Both tests are essential to demonstrate language proficiency and knowledge of British life.

Finally, incorrect payment is another common ground for refusal. Failing to pay the correct application fee or encountering issues with the payment method can invalidate the application. Ensuring the payment is made correctly and on time is essential to avoid this pitfall. Addressing these common issues can significantly improve the chances of a successful British citizenship application.

 

2. Tips for a Successful Application

 

a. Carefully Review Eligibility Criteria: Ensure you meet all the eligibility criteria before applying, including residency, language proficiency, good character, and passing the Life in the UK test.

b. Complete Application Forms Correctly: Double-check that all sections of the application form are completed accurately and truthfully. Check for spelling errors and ensure you have answered all relevant questions and sections.

c. Comprehensive Supporting Documentation: Gather all necessary documents well in advance, ensuring they are current and correctly formatted. This includes passports, proof of residency, language certificates, and test results.

d. Provide Proof of UK Residency: Include comprehensive proof of your residency, such as utility bills, bank statements, and official correspondence over the qualifying period.

e. Evidence Good Character: Be transparent about any criminal history and provide explanations where necessary. Ensure all legal and financial obligations are in order.

f. Pass Required Tests: Prepare thoroughly for the English language and Life in the UK tests. Use study materials and practice tests.

g. Check Payment Details: Ensure you pay the correct fee and that your payment method is valid. Keep a copy of your payment receipt for your records.

h. Take Professional Advice: If you are unsure about any part of the application, consider seeking advice from legal professionals or immigration advisors.

 

Section E: Home Office Decision

 

The Home Office decision letter for British citizenship provides applicants with the outcome of their application.

 

1. If Your British Citizenship Application is Approved

 

If your British citizenship application is approved, you will receive a letter from the Home Office confirming the approval. The next step is to attend a citizenship ceremony, which is a mandatory part of the naturalisation process for adults.

You will need to book your ceremony within three months of receiving the approval letter. The ceremony is usually held at your local council office, and you may invite guests to join you in celebrating this significant milestone. During the ceremony, you will take an oath of allegiance (or an affirmation if you prefer not to swear by God) and pledge loyalty to the United Kingdom and its values.

Upon completing the oath and pledge, you will be presented with a certificate of British citizenship. This certificate is an important document and should be kept safe, as it proves your status as a British citizen.

Once you have received your certificate, you can apply for a British passport, which will allow you to travel freely in and out of the UK. You will also enjoy all the rights and privileges of British citizenship, including the right to vote, work without restrictions, and access to public services such as healthcare and education.

If you have children, they may also be eligible to register as British citizens, depending on their circumstances. Being granted British citizenship marks the culmination of a significant journey and opens up many opportunities and protections as a recognised member of the UK community.

 

2. If Your British Citizenship Application is Refused

 

If your British citizenship application is refused, you will receive a decision letter from the Home Office detailing the reasons for the rejection. This letter is crucial as it provides specific feedback on why your application was not successful.

Common reasons for refusal can include incomplete or incorrect application forms, insufficient residency evidence, lack of required documents, a criminal record, failed English language or Life in the UK tests, and incorrect payment.

Addressing the grounds for refusal promptly and accurately can improve your chances if you decide to reapply. Taking professional advice can help you understand how to resolve the issues before making a new application.

Read our full guide to your options if your citizenship application is refused.

 

Section F: Benefits of Holding British Citizenship

 

As a British citizen, you gain the right to live and work permanently in the UK without any immigration restrictions. This status also provides access to the UK’s healthcare and education systems. British citizens also have the right to vote in local and national elections, stand for public office, and apply for a British passport.

Citizenship offers individuals a sense of security and belonging, affirming their place within the UK community and ensuring the ability to:

 

1. Right to Live and Work in the UK

One of the primary benefits of British citizenship is the unrestricted right to live and work in the UK. As a British citizen, you no longer need to worry about visa renewals, immigration controls, or work permits. This security allows you to settle permanently in the UK, pursue employment or self-employment opportunities freely, and enjoy the stability of knowing you can stay in the country without any limitations.

Additionally, British citizens have the right to leave and re-enter the UK without restrictions, making international travel more straightforward and stress-free.

 

2. Rights to Be Joined by Non-British Relatives

As a British citizen, you have the right to sponsor non-British relatives to join you in the UK. This process typically involves applying for family visas, such as the spouse, partner, child, or parent visa. The applicant must meet the specific visa eligibility criteria, which may include financial requirements, proof of relationship and English language proficiency.

Successful applications allow your non-British relatives to join you in the UK to live, work and study.

 

3. Access to Healthcare and Social Services

British citizens have full access to the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), which provides comprehensive healthcare services free at the point of use. This includes general practitioner (GP) visits, hospital care, emergency treatment, and specialist services. Access to the NHS ensures that British citizens can receive high-quality medical care without financial burden.

British citizens may also be able to access social services and benefits, including unemployment benefits, housing assistance, child benefits, and pensions, if eligible.

 

4. Right to Vote

Another significant benefit of British citizenship is the right to participate in the UK’s democratic processes. As a British citizen, you have the right to vote in local, national, and European elections, allowing you to have a say in who governs the country and how it is run. This participation extends to referendums and other significant public votes, giving you a voice in critical decisions that affect the nation.

British citizens can also stand for public office, enabling them to run for positions such as Member of Parliament (MP), local councillor, or other elected roles.

 

5. British Citizenship & Dual Nationality

Dual nationality is permitted in the UK, which means you can hold British citizenship and citizenship of another country at the same time, provided your original country of nationality allows this.

It is not a requirement under UK law to have to renounce your existing nationality in order to be eligible for British citizenship. Likewise, UK nationals can apply for foreign citizenship and retain their British citizenship.

You will need to check the rules on dual nationality for your country of existing nationality by contacting its UK embassy, as you may required to notify of your change in nationality status and in some cases, you may have to relinquish your original citizenship if proceeding to naturalise as a British citizen.

 

Section G: Summary

 

The British citizenship application process is demanding on applicants, requiring extensive documentation to prove eligibility under the naturalisation criteria.

Getting the application right is crucial to avoid unwanted delays and additional costs. Common reasons for application rejection include incomplete or incorrect forms, insufficient residency evidence, lack of required documents, criminal records, failed tests, and incorrect payment.

Professional guidance can help to avoid issues with your application and optimise your chances of being approved for British citizenship.

 

Section H: Need Assistance?

 

DavidsonMorris are UK immigration specialists. We support individuals with all types of UK citizenship and nationality applications, including guidance on applications for British citizenship.

We have extensive experience of managing naturalisation applications on behalf of applicants, and bring substantial insight into Home Office protocols and requirements when processing naturalisation applications. We also have expertise in complex applications, such as time-sensitive applications or where there are evidentiary challenges.

For expert advice on your British citizenship application, contact us.

 

Section I: British Citizenship FAQs

 

What are the basic eligibility criteria for British citizenship?
To be eligible for British citizenship, you must meet several criteria, including residency requirements, English language proficiency, good character, and passing the Life in the UK test. Specific criteria can vary depending on the type of citizenship application.

 

How long do I need to live in the UK before applying for citizenship?
Generally, you must have lived in the UK for at least five years, or three years if you are married to a British citizen. During this period, you should not have spent more than 450 days outside the UK in the last five years, or 270 days if married to a British citizen, and no more than 90 days outside the UK in the last 12 months.

 

What documents do I need to apply for British citizenship?
Required documents typically include proof of identity (passport, biometric residence permit), proof of residency (utility bills, bank statements), English language proficiency certificate, Life in the UK test pass notification, and proof of good character (criminal record certificate, financial history).

 

How much does it cost to apply for British citizenship?
It costs £1,630 per adult application, which includes the naturalisation ceremony fee. Child applications cost £1,214 each.

 

What is the Life in the UK test, and how can I prepare for it?
The Life in the UK test assesses your knowledge of British history, culture, and traditions. It consists of 24 multiple-choice questions. You can prepare by studying the official handbook and taking practice tests available online.

 

Can I apply for British citizenship if I have a criminal record?
Having a criminal record does not automatically disqualify you, but it can affect the good character requirement. It is essential to disclose any criminal history and provide explanations where necessary. The Home Office will assess your case individually.

 

How long does the citizenship application process take?
The processing time for British citizenship applications is generally around six months, but it can vary. Delays may occur due to missing documents or high application volumes, so it’s advisable to apply well in advance of any planned travel or other deadlines.

 

Can my children apply for British citizenship with me?
Children can apply for British citizenship as dependents on your application. They must meet certain criteria, and additional documents will be required, such as birth certificates and proof of your relationship.

 

What happens after my application is approved?
If your application is approved, you will be invited to attend a citizenship ceremony where you will take an oath of allegiance and receive your certificate of British citizenship. This ceremony is a mandatory part of the process for adults.

 

Section J: Glossary

 

Biometric Residence Permit (BRP): A card issued to foreign nationals in the UK that contains biographic details, immigration status, and biometric information (fingerprints and photo).

Citizenship by Birth: A type of British citizenship for individuals born in the UK to at least one parent who is a British citizen or settled in the UK.

Citizenship by Descent: A type of British citizenship for individuals born outside the UK to at least one parent who is a British citizen at the time of their birth.

Citizenship by Marriage: A pathway to British citizenship for spouses or civil partners of British citizens, requiring a minimum residency period and other criteria.

Good Character Requirement: A criterion for British citizenship that assesses the applicant’s criminal record, financial history, and adherence to UK laws.

Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR): A permanent residency status in the UK allowing individuals to live and work without time restrictions.

Life in the UK Test: A test assessing knowledge of British traditions, history, and everyday life required for most citizenship applicants.

Naturalisation: The process by which a non-British adult can apply for British citizenship after meeting residency and other specific criteria.

National Health Service (NHS): The publicly funded healthcare system in the UK, providing a wide range of medical services free at the point of use for British citizens.

Proof of Residency: Documents that verify an individual’s continuous stay in the UK, such as utility bills, bank statements, and official correspondence.

Residency Requirements: The criteria related to the amount of time an applicant must have lived in the UK to be eligible for citizenship.

UK Visa and Citizenship Application Services (UKVCAS): Centres where applicants for UK visas and citizenship can provide biometric information and submit documents.

Visa-Free Travel: The ability to travel to certain countries without needing to obtain a visa beforehand, often granted to British passport holders.

 

Section K: Additional Resources

 

UK Government ‚Äď Apply for British Citizenship
Official guidance on the application process, eligibility criteria, and required documents.
https://www.gov.uk/becoming-a-british-citizen

 

UK Government ‚Äď Life in the UK Test
Information on the Life in the UK test, including how to book, study materials, and practice tests.
https://www.gov.uk/life-in-the-uk-test

 

UK Visa and Citizenship Application Services (UKVCAS)
Details on booking biometrics appointments and submitting documents for citizenship applications.
https://www.ukvcas.co.uk/

 

Immigration Law Practitioners’ Association (ILPA)
A professional association offering resources and advice on immigration law, including citizenship.
https://ilpa.org.uk/

 

Home Office ‚Äď Nationality Policy Guidance
Official policy documents and guidance on nationality and citizenship from the UK Home Office.
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nationality-policy-guidance

 

British Council ‚Äď English Language Requirements
Information on English language tests accepted for UK citizenship applications and preparation resources.
https://www.britishcouncil.org/exam/ielts/uk-visa/requirements

 

 


Founder and Managing Director Anne Morris is a fully qualified solicitor and trusted adviser to large corporates through to SMEs, providing strategic immigration and global mobility advice to support employers with UK operations to meet their workforce needs through corporate immigration.

She is a recognised by Legal 500and Chambers as a legal expert and delivers Board-level advice on business migration and compliance risk management as well as overseeing the firm’s development of new client propositions and delivery of cost and time efficient processing of applications.

Anne is an active public speaker, immigration commentator, and immigration policy contributor and regularly hosts training sessions for employers and HR professionals



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